The Musings from Inside the Bell Jar

"I didn’t want any flowers, I only wanted to lie with my hands turned up and be utterly empty. How free it is, you have no idea how free."

bookofvioletskies:

reikaoki:

imthezombiequeen:

alishalovescats1701:

crimsonclad:

five-boys-with-accents:

Eeyore is just one of those characters that you wanna scoop up and hug forever.

One awesome thing about Eeyore is that even though he is basically clinically depressed, he still gets invited to participate in adventures and shenanigans with all of his friends. And they never expect him to pretend to feel happy, they just love him anyway, and they never leave him behind or ask him to change.

Oh

oh

And he does feel happy, though. He can be happy. He just doesn’t show it as much as the others do.
There was a whole episode about that - Piglet sees him sitting on a hilltop and thinks he’s sadder than usual, and does all he can to cheer him up. Nothing works and the next day he’s back on the hill, and Piglet apologizes because he thinks in trying to help, he just made him sad again and ”I don’t come here when I’m sad. I come up here because I’m happy.”

There’s just something about that…

See? He focuses on the good. :)

(Source: galaxieirwin, via muchneededmerch)

larkfall:

A version of the ‘Seal of God’, found in the Devil’s Dyke, Cambridge. Part of a recent exhibition on magic at the Bodleian Library, which included a marble version of Dee’s holy table, the Rawlinson necromantic codex and the “Ripley scrowle”.

larkfall:

A version of the ‘Seal of God’, found in the Devil’s Dyke, Cambridge. Part of a recent exhibition on magic at the Bodleian Library, which included a marble version of Dee’s holy table, the Rawlinson necromantic codex and the “Ripley scrowle”.

(via the-darkest-of-lights)

brassmanticore:

Talismanic Scroll
Egypt, 11th century
Contains ayat al-kursi, among other verses and invocations.

Centuries before block printing was introduced in Europe, the technique was used in the Islamic world to produce miniature texts consisting of prayers, incantations, and Qur’anic verses that were kept in amulet boxes. The text on this amulet is in the angular kufic script. The six-pointed star, a familiar symbol in Islamic art, is usually called “Solomon’s seal.”

Metropolitan Museum of Art 

brassmanticore:

Talismanic Scroll

Egypt, 11th century

Contains ayat al-kursi, among other verses and invocations.

Centuries before block printing was introduced in Europe, the technique was used in the Islamic world to produce miniature texts consisting of prayers, incantations, and Qur’anic verses that were kept in amulet boxes. The text on this amulet is in the angular kufic script. The six-pointed star, a familiar symbol in Islamic art, is usually called “Solomon’s seal.”

Metropolitan Museum of Art 

(via the-darkest-of-lights)